Attica Scott

U.S. House, KY-03

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My parents named me after the correctional facility in Attica, New York — the site of the famous prison rebellion for better living conditions and political rights. I believe this was my parents’ way of calling me to action! And I have answered their call by dedicating my life to being deeply rooted in community and public service.

I was born in the historic Beecher Terrace public housing unit. Growing up, I noticed the stark difference between the white neighborhoods where I went to school and my community that lacked healthy foods and had perpetually flashing red- and blue- lights.

I obtained my BA in Political Science from Knoxville College and MS in Communications from the University of Tennessee. It was in Tennessee where I had my son and daughter, my two greatest accomplishments in life. After spending several years building a family in Tennessee, I decided to come back home and build my community.

Continuing my calling, I worked at organizations where we fought for economic and social justice and with local neighborhood groups to improve our city. However, I knew that I could make a greater difference at the legislative level and I joined the first class of Emerge Kentucky. I ran for the Board of Education, was elected to Metro Council, then defeated a 34-year incumbent to become the first Black woman elected to the Kentucky General Assembly in twenty years. In my decades of public service, I have fought for policies that uplift everyone in Louisville.

What am I fighting for?

As a public servant, I have fought for policies that will uplift everyone across the city. We are a diverse community, facing many challenges. I know these challenges because I have faced them personally. The experiences of the past few years have shown me that now is the time to step up and take our grassroots, community-based energy to DC. I believe it’s a false narrative to keep telling Black women to wait. Washington has the power to give people the resources they need to thrive if our political leaders would have the courage to make transformative change. I am that leader. I have lived the struggles and seen the inequities. As a Black woman and mother, I have fought against the obstacles built to hinder our progress. I won’t have this anymore. Not for my children and not for my community. I am running to be the people’s champion at a higher level and to speak up for those who have been ready for real change. This campaign is about building a community where we all win. We deserve better than a member of Congress who opposes the Green New Deal, who failed to lead on any police accountability measures even after the racial justice uprisings in his own backyard, or who refused to stand with immigrants in our community as they called to abolish ICE, and we deserve better than a member of Congress who has not to lead on any issues related to gender or race.

My DFA Values

I was the first Black woman elected to our statehouse in nearly 20 years. I am often the lone “no” vote on legislation that, on the surface, is sold as a good measure for marginalized communities but is really performative politics for politicians who could care less about us. In the statehouse, I am currently working on a Universal Basic Income legislation, and a bill to support Black wealth building in the west end of Louisville. I have repeatedly filed the Black Maternal Care Act and the CROWN Act, as well as bills to expand the education of Black and Indigenous history in our public schools. As a state representative, I file bills at the request of constituents and then engage with them in strategic organizing and statewide mobilization on those bills. For example, when my community organized a march and rally to our state capitol in support of our no-knock warrants bill, many of the participants had never been to The People’s House because they didn’t see themselves reflected in legislation. Each Juneteenth, I hold a voter registration canvas in predominately Black and low-income neighborhoods in Louisville. I am proud that our Campaign Manager is a Black woman with deep roots in Louisville and Kentucky, and that our Campaign Treasurer is a Black man with deep roots in our city and state.

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